Composting #20: Military Ecologies

Tuesday 5 September, 4-5:30 | Facilitated by Lindsay Kelley, Susan Reid & Astrida Neimanis | Readings: Krupar (2007) ‘Where eagles dare: an ethno-fable with personal landfill’, Burke et al (2016) ‘Planet Politics: A Manifesto from the End of IR’, Moore & Kosut (2012) ‘Bees, Borders, and Bombs: A Social Account of Theorizing and Weaponizing Bees’, Cohn (1987) ‘Sex and Death in the Rational World of Defense Intellectuals’

 

For Carol Cohn, language defines the nuclear environment, with human victims and users of nuclear weapons contributing to a critical evaluation of what it might mean to be a “defense intellectual.” How might we update Cohn to be relevant to a new materialist more-than-human understanding of the world? While acknowledging the wealth of feminist critiques of militarism and patriarchy, a composted analyses of military ecologies could be extended to (a) consider a more-than-human world and (b) understand the tangled up ways that militarism works. For example, monolithic critiques (of “patriarchy” for example) may not be adequate to a task of figuring out how militarism (its languages, its technoscience, its culture) also makes certain things possible, from biomedical technologies to food systems to infrastructures to access to all kinds of knowledges. Yet in a world where militarism is the very air we breathe, what should be recuperated and/or transformed from feminist analyses? As we stare increasingly down the barrel of “being met with fire and fury”, how can composting help us figure out the uneven yet pervasive operations of militarisms in everyday life?

 

LOCATION: Brennan McCallum building, Level 8, SOPHI Common Room, the University of Sydney

REQUIRED READING:

Shiloh R Krupar (2007) ‘Where eagles dare: an ethno-fable with personal landfill’,  Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 25: 194-212 (all pp)

Anthony Burke et al (2016) ‘Planet Politics: A Manifesto from the End of IR’, Millennium: Journal of International Studies, 44(3): 499– 523 (“The Double Crisis” pp. 503-504 and “Diplomacy, as an institution, is failing” pp 507-510)

Lisa Jean Moore & Mary Kosut (2012) ‘Bees, Borders, and Bombs: A Social Account of Theorizing and Weaponizing Bees’, in Animals and War: Studies of Europe and North America edited by Ryan Hediger. Leiden, Boston: Brill, pp 29-44. (“Historical Overview of Bees in Wartime” and “On Spies, Sniffers and Swarms” pp 32-38)

Carol Cohn (1987) ‘Sex and Death in the Rational World of Defense Intellectuals’, Signs, 12(4): 687-718. (“Learning to Speak the Language” pp 703-707)

TIME PRESSED:

Shiloh R Krupar (2007) ‘Where eagles dare: an ethno-fable with personal landfill’ (all pages)

OPTIONAL READING:

 Erika Cudworth & Steve Hobden (2015) ‘The posthuman way of war’, Security Dialogue, 46(6): 513– 529

Cynthia Enloe (2014) ‘Going Bananas! Where are women in the international politics of bananas?’ In Bananas, Beaches and Bases, edited by Cynthia Enloe, University of California Press, Chapter Six.

Max Ritts & John Shiga (2016) ‘Military Cetology’, Environmental Humanities, 8(2): 196-214.

Gary E Machlis & Thor Hanson (2008) ‘Warfare Ecology’, BioScience, 58(8): 729-736.

 

Header Image from WikiMedia: ‘Battered religious figures stand watch on a hill above a tattered valley’. Nagasaki, Japan. September 24, 1945, 6 weeks after the city was destroyed by the world’s second atomic bomb attack. Photo by Cpl. Lynn P. Walker, Jr. (USA Marine Corps)

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